Coping With Grief When You Have A Chronic Illness

By: Myles O'Riordan
Monday, May 29, 2017

When diagnosed with a chronic illness, there are a lot of things you have to give up. In some cases, you may even feel like a different person, compounding this sense of grief and making it even more unmanageable. The stages of grief when confronted with a chronic illness are, in fact, very much the same as those we experience after the loss of a loved one. We can feel the same denial, anger, resentment, bargaining, helplessness, and depression. Thankfully, the path to acceptance isn't ever out of your reach. This process can be a difficult one, but you owe it to yourself and your loved ones to take the right steps and get the help you deserve.

Grief is a natural reaction to loss and is ultimately good for us. It can help us come to terms with things that we can't yet accept and is also a learning process. We will all experience its symptoms at numerous points in our lives whether we want to or not. As with the death of a loved one, coming to terms with being diagnosed with a chronic or debilitating illness is no easy road. To begin with, it is a challenge for all of us mentally to accept that we are no longer as able to do things as we once were. Indeed, many faculties are affected when coping with a chronic illness. These can cover emotional wellbeing, mental states, physical strength, and spiritual awareness. All of these can be put to the test, making it an especially trying time. This holds true not just for you, but for your friends and family as well. Seeking help, whether it be professional or not, can be daunting. Some see therapy as a sign of weakness, but it is instead a sign of great strength to admit that you need help and then seek it out.

Depression is another factor that may inhibit your ability to think clearly during this time. If you think that you or a loved one are heading down this path it could end badly if not treated in time. Spending time with friends and family is an important step and will help solidify your sense of community. Furthermore, this sense of togetherness makes an enormous difference when facing any obstacle. Knowing that you have the support of those you care about is paramount. Diagnosis of a chronic illness is no time to insulate yourself with the aim of protecting those around you. Instead, make the most of the time you have with them and make it count. You will feel better in the long run and we can guarantee that it will make all the difference in their lives, too. Group and family therapy are recommended by many grief therapy professionals and the majority will agree that it will help significantly.

Professional help is also always an option. If you feel that opening up to a therapist will suit you better than talking to family this is the route you should take. Some people do find this more comforting. This also removes some strain on your relationships if they ever do end up feeling the pressure. Emotions can get the better of all of us and sometimes a professional is our best bet. They are also completely committed to you and are absolutely dedicated to your wellbeing, no matter what. There are many resources available when it comes to finding a qualified grief counsellor and you should go over them all to make a choice that suits you best. If you have any further questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us at Wagg Funeral Home. Our professional and knowledgeable staff are more than equipped to help guide you through any issues you may have.

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